Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

gesture Related Abstracts

3 Human Gesture Recognition for Real-Time Control of Humanoid Robot

Authors: S. Aswath, Chinmaya Krishna Tilak, Amal Suresh, Ganesh Udupa

Abstract:

There are technologies to control a humanoid robot in many ways. But the use of Electromyogram (EMG) electrodes has its own importance in setting up the control system. The EMG based control system helps to control robotic devices with more fidelity and precision. In this paper, development of an electromyogram based interface for human gesture recognition for the control of a humanoid robot is presented. To recognize control signs in the gestures, a single channel EMG sensor is positioned on the muscles of the human body. Instead of using a remote control unit, the humanoid robot is controlled by various gestures performed by the human. The EMG electrodes attached to the muscles generates an analog signal due to the effect of nerve impulses generated on moving muscles of the human being. The analog signals taken up from the muscles are supplied to a differential muscle sensor that processes the given signal to generate a signal suitable for the microcontroller to get the control over a humanoid robot. The signal from the differential muscle sensor is converted to a digital form using the ADC of the microcontroller and outputs its decision to the CM-530 humanoid robot controller through a Zigbee wireless interface. The output decision of the CM-530 processor is sent to a motor driver in order to control the servo motors in required direction for human like actions. This method for gaining control of a humanoid robot could be used for performing actions with more accuracy and ease. In addition, a study has been conducted to investigate the controllability and ease of use of the interface and the employed gestures.

Keywords: gesture, Humanoid Robot, Electromyogram, microcontroller, ZigBee, muscle sensor

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2 Gesture in the Arabic and Malay Languages a Comparative Study

Authors: Siti Sara binti Hj Ahmad, Adil Elshiekh Abdalla

Abstract:

The Arabic and Malay languages belong to different languageā€™s families; while the Arabic language descends from the Semitic language, Malay belongs to the Austronesian (Malayo-Polynesian) family. Hence, the grammatical systems of the two languages differ from each other. Arabic, being a language found in the heart of the dessert, and Malay is the language found in the heart of thick equatorial forests, is another source of vital cultural differences. Consequently, it is expected that this situation will create differences in the ways of how speakers of the two languages perceive the world around them, convey and understand their messages. On the other hand, as the majority of the speakers of Malay language are Muslims, Arabic language found its way in this region; currently, Arabic is widely taught in school, some terms of it found their way in the Malay language. Accordingly, the Arabic language and culture have widely penetrated into the Malay language. This study is proposed with the aim to find out the differences and similarities between the two languages, in the term of the nonverbal communication. The result of this study will be of high significance, as it will help in enhancing the mutual understanding between the speakers of these languages. The comparative analysis approach will be utilized in this study.

Keywords: Arabic language, gesture, Comparative Analysis, Malay language

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1 A Holographic Infotainment System for Connected and Driverless Cars: An Exploratory Study of Gesture Based Interaction

Authors: Nicholas Lambert, Seungyeon Ryu, Mehmet Mulla, Albert Kim

Abstract:

In this paper, an interactive in-car interface called HoloDash is presented. It is intended to provide information and infotainment in both autonomous vehicles and ‘connected cars’, vehicles equipped with Internet access via cellular services. The research focuses on the development of interactive avatars for this system and its gesture-based control system. This is a case study for the development of a possible human-centred means of presenting a connected or autonomous vehicle’s On-Board Diagnostics through a projected ‘holographic’ infotainment system. This system is termed a Holographic Human Vehicle Interface (HHIV), as it utilises a dashboard projection unit and gesture detection. The research also examines the suitability for gestures in an automotive environment, given that it might be used in both driver-controlled and driverless vehicles. Using Human Centred Design methods, questions were posed to test subjects and preferences discovered in terms of the gesture interface and the user experience for passengers within the vehicle. These affirm the benefits of this mode of visual communication for both connected and driverless cars.

Keywords: Human-Computer Interaction, gesture, User-Centered Design, holographic interface

Procedia PDF Downloads 160