Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 4

EFL students Related Abstracts

4 Teaching Gender and Language in the EFL Classroom in the Arab World: Algerian Students’ Awareness of Their Gender Identities from New Perspectives

Authors: Amina Babou

Abstract:

Gender and language is a moot and miscellaneous arena in the sphere of sociolinguistics, which has been proliferated so widely and rapidly in recent years. The dawn of research on gender and foreign language education was against the feminist researchers who allowed space for the bustling concourse of voices and perspectives in the arena of gender and language differences, in the early to the mid-1970. The objective of this scrutiny is to explore to what extent teaching gender and language in the English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom plays a pivotal role in learning language information and skills. And the gist of this paper is to investigate how EFL students in Algeria conflate their gender identities with the linguistic practices and scholastic expertise. To grapple with the full range of issues about the EFL students’ awareness about the negotiation of meanings in the classroom, we opt for observing, interviewing, and questioning later to check using ‘how-do-you do’ procedure. The analysis of the EFL classroom discourse, from five Algerian universities, reveals that speaking strategies such as the manners students make an abrupt topic shifts, respond spontaneously to the teacher, ask more questions, interrupt others to seize control of conversations and monopolize the speaking floor through denying what others have said, do not sit very lightly on 80.4% of female students’ shoulders. The data indicate that female students display the assertive style as a strategy of learning to subvert the norms of femininity, especially in the speaking module.

Keywords: Linguistics, Classroom Discourse, gender identities, EFL students

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3 Playing with Gender Identity through Learning English as a Foreign Language in Algeria: A Gender-Based Analysis of Linguistic Practices

Authors: Amina Babou

Abstract:

Gender and language is a moot and miscellaneous arena in the sphere of socio-linguistics, which has been proliferated so widely and rapidly in recent years. The dawn of research on gender and foreign language education was against the feminist researchers who allowed space for the bustling concourse of voices and perspectives in the arena of gender and language differences, in the early to the mid-1970. The objective of this scrutiny is to explore to what extent teaching gender and language in the English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom plays a pivotal role in learning language information and skills. Moreover, the gist of this paper is to investigate how EFL students in Algeria conflate their gender identities with the linguistic practices and scholastic expertise. To grapple with the full range of issues about the EFL students’ awareness about the negotiation of meanings in the classroom, we opt for observing, interviewing, and questioning later to check using ‘how-do-you do’ procedure. The analysis of the EFL classroom discourse, from five Algerian universities, reveals that speaking strategies such as the manners students make an abrupt topic shifts, respond spontaneously to the teacher, ask more questions, interrupt others to seize control of conversations and monopolize the speaking floor through denying what others have said, do not sit very lightly on 80.4% of female students’ shoulders. The data indicate that female students display the assertive style as a strategy of learning to subvert the norms of femininity, especially in the speaking module.

Keywords: Foreign Language, Gender Identity, EFL students, linguistic styles

Procedia PDF Downloads 346
2 Using Metacognitive Strategies in Reading Comprehension by EFL Students

Authors: Simin Sadeghi-Saeb

Abstract:

Metacognitive strategies consistently play important roles in reading comprehension. The metacognitive strategies involve the active monitoring and consequent regulation and orchestration of the cognitive processes in relation to the cognitive objects or data on which they bear. In this paper, the effect of instruction in using metacognitive strategies on reading academic materials, type of metacognitive strategies were mostly used by college university students before and after the instruction and the level they use those strategies before and after the instruction were studied. For these aims, 50 female college students were chosen. Then, they were divided randomly into two groups, experimental and control groups. At first session, students in both groups took the standard TOFEL exam. After the pre-test had been administered, the instruction began. After treatment, a post-test was taken. It is useful to state that after pre-test and post-test the same questionnaire was handed to the students of experimental group. The results of this research show that the instruction of metacognitive strategies has positive effect on the students' scores in reading comprehension tests. Furthermore, it showed that before and after the instruction, the students' usage of metacognitive strategies changed. Also, it demonstrated that the instruction affected the students' level of metacognitive strategies' usage.

Keywords: Instruction, metacognitive strategies, EFL students, English reading comprehension

Procedia PDF Downloads 130
1 Uncovering the Relationship between EFL Students' Self-Concept and Their Willingness to Communicate in Language Classes

Authors: Seyedeh Khadijeh Amirian, Seyed Mohammad Reza Amirian, Narges Hekmati

Abstract:

The current study aims at examining the relationship between English as a foreign language (EFL) students' self-concept and their willingness to communicate (WTC) in EFL classes. To this effect, two questionnaires, namely 'Willingness to Communicate' (MacIntyre et al., 2001) and 'Self-Concept Scale' (Liu and Wang, 2005), were distributed among 174 (45 males and 129 females) Iranian EFL university students. Correlation and regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between the two variables. The results indicated that there was a significantly positive correlation between EFL students' self-concept and their WTC in EFL classes (p < .0.05). Moreover, regression analyses indicated that self-concept has a significantly positive influence on students’ WTC in language classes (B= .302, p < .0.05) and explains .302 percent of the variance in the dependent variable (WTC). The results are discussed with regards to the individual differences in educational contexts, and implications are offered.

Keywords: self-concept, EFL students, willingness to communicate, language classes

Procedia PDF Downloads 1