Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 7

Developed Countries Related Abstracts

7 A Comparative Study of Secondary Education Curriculum of Iran with Some Developed Countries in the World

Authors: Seyyed Abdollah Hojjati

Abstract:

Review in the areas of secondary education; it is a kind of comparative requires very careful scrutiny in educational structure of different countries,In upcoming review of the basic structure of our educational system in Islamic republic of Iran with somedeveloped countries in the world, Analyzing of strengthsand weaknesses in main areas, A simple review of the above methods do not consider this particular community, Modifythe desired result can be expressed in the secondary school curriculum and academic guidance of under graduate students in a skill-driven and creativity growth, It not just improves the health and dynamism of this period and increases the secondary teachers' authority and the relationship between teacher and student in this course will be meaningful and attractive, But with reduced of false prosperity and guaranteed institutes and quizzes, areas will be provided for students to enjoy the feeling ofthe psychological comfort and to have the highest growth of creativity .

Keywords: Curriculum, comparative, Developed Countries, Iran, curriculum of secondary education

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6 Health Information Technology in Developing Countries: A Structured Literature Review with Reference to the Case of Libya

Authors: Jim S. Briggs, Haythem A. Nakkas, Philip J. Scott

Abstract:

This paper reports a structured literature review of the application of Health Information Technology in developing countries, defined as the World Bank categories Low-income countries, Lower-middle-income, and Upper-middle-income countries. The aim was to identify and classify the various applications of health information technology to assess its current state in developing countries and explore potential areas of research. We offer specific analysis and application of HIT in Libya as one of the developing countries. Method: A structured literature review was conducted using the following online databases: IEEE, Science Direct, PubMed, and Google Scholar. Publication dates were set for 2000-2013. For the PubMed search, publications in English, French, and Arabic were specified. Using a content analysis approach, 159 papers were analyzed and a total number of 26 factors were identified that affect the adoption of health information technology. Results: Of the 2681 retrieved articles, 159 met the inclusion criteria which were carefully analyzed and classified. Conclusion: The implementation of health information technology across developing countries is varied. Whilst it was initially expected financial constraints would have severely limited health information technology implementation, some developing countries like India have nevertheless dominated the literature and taken the lead in conducting scientific research. Comparing the number of studies to the number of countries in each category, we found that Low-income countries and Lower-middle-income had more studies carried out than Upper-middle-income countries. However, whilst IT has been used in various sectors of the economy, the healthcare sector in developing countries is still failing to benefit fully from the potential advantages that IT can offer.

Keywords: Implementation, developing countries, Health Information Technology, Developed Countries, Failure, Libya, factors, success

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5 Territorial Marketing as a Tool to Overcome the "Underdevelopment Whirlpools": Prospective Directions and Experiences of Developing Countries

Authors: E. G. Popkova, I. A. Morozova, T. N. Litvinova

Abstract:

As a result, numerous studies of economic systems the authors have identified and substantiated the existence of a“underdevelopment whirlpool” is a phenomenon of considerable differentiation level of economic development in developed and developing countries. This article reflects the relationship “underdevelopment whirlpools” marketing areas as a tool to overcome them. The article presents the author's recommendations for dealing with “underdevelopment whirlpools”. Based on the experience of successful developing countries showing strong economic growth, the author analyzes possible future direction of overcoming the “underdevelopment whirlpools”. The author details the aspect of increasing product through the positioning of the territory as a way out of the “underdevelopment whirlpools”.

Keywords: developing countries, Developed Countries, underdevelopment whirlpool, disparities of economic growth, marketing territories

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4 The Impact of Innovation Best Practices in Economic Development

Authors: Hanadi Mubarak AL-Mubaraki, Michael Busler

Abstract:

Innovation is the process of making changes, differences, and novelties in the products and services, adding values and business practices to create economic and social benefit. The purpose of this paper is to identify the strengths and weaknesses of innovation programs in developed and developing countries. We used a mixed-methods approach, quantitative as survey and qualitative as a multi-case study to examine innovation best practices in developed and developing countries. In addition, four case studies of innovation organisations based on the best practices and successful implementation in the developed and developing countries are selected for examination. The research findings provide guidance, suggestions, and recommendations for future implementation in developed and developing countries for practitioners such as policy makers, governments, funded organizations, and strategic institutions. In conclusion, innovation programs are vital tools for economic growth, knowledge, and technology transfer based on the several indicators such as creativity, entrepreneurship, role of government, role of university, strategic focus, new products, survival rate, job creation, start-up companies, and number of patents. The authors aim to conduct future research which will include a comparative study of innovation case studies between developed and developing countries for policy implications worldwide. The originality of this study makes a contribution to the current literature about the innovation best practice in developed and developing countries.

Keywords: Entrepreneurship, Economic Development, Developed Countries, innovation program

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3 A Systematic Review on the Effect of Gender Diverse Board on Corporate Social Responsibility

Authors: Rofayda A. Hout

Abstract:

This study aims to investigate the relationship between women on board and corporate social responsibility (CSR) in addition to the role of corporate governance in introducing and implementing CSR practices. Analysis has been conducted on 30 prior studies published between 2007 and 2017 to investigate the common areas and differences across the studies with varying conclusions. The study also handles the differences between developing and developed countries when it comes to gender diverse board and corporate social responsibility. The review conducted reveals that there is a positive relationship between women on board and corporate social responsibility. Comparison between developed and developing countries with respect to CSR implementation highlighted differences due to possible reasons relating to socio-political, cultural, socio-economic, and institutional factors. In addition, developing countries perceive CSR as philanthropy rather than part of their business mission. Given that, CSR needs to be integrated into the corporate strategic planning and be considered as fundamental part of the operations to improve the region’s needs. Developing countries were late in adopting CSR in comparison to developed countries, thus to have a fair comparison between developed and developing countries, corporate governance in developing countries should take serious steps in developing a framework for CSR implementation and integrating it within corporate operations.

Keywords: Corporate Governance, Corporate Social Responsibility, developing countries, Developed Countries, Corporate Performance, systematic review, gender diverse board

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2 Intellectual Capital Disclosure: A Study of Australia and Sri Lanka

Authors: Puwanenthiren Pratheepkanth

Abstract:

This study considers whether national development level influences a firm’s voluntary intellectual capital disclosure (ICD) provided by a sample of 100 Australian and 100 Sri Lankan firms in terms of a two-years during 2015-16. This two-nation study uses a content analysis and literature-review analysis to provide an understanding of the underlying forces and issues. It was found that Australian firms tend to rely heavily on external structure disclosures (with particular attention to brands, customer loyalty, and research collaborations), but Sri Lankan relatively larger firms prefer intellectual property disclosures and the smaller firms tend to be as adept at external structure as their Australian counterparts. It was also found that the nature of a firm tends to trump the nurture of the development level of the country in which the firm is embedded. While a wider diffusion of better ICD methodology under International Financial Reporting Standard (IFRS) could improve the cost-effectiveness of financial reporting and generally increase efficiency, this is unlikely to occur until competition is more of a spur.

Keywords: Content Analysis, developing countries, Developed Countries, intellectual capital disclosure

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1 Management Accounting Revolution: Developed and Developing Country

Authors: Puwanenthiren Pratheepkanth

Abstract:

The main aim of this paper is to analyse existing literature (1960 -2016) on management accounting revolution by firms in a comparative perspective to see whether any differences between developed and developing countries context. The significant role that management accounting practices play in corporate finance is well established by reams of research articles. The study reveals that there are clear limitations to the literature review, it suggests that a majority of management accounting practices’ studies are focused on developed markets and that there is a scarcity of serious analyses of the situation in emerging markets.

Keywords: developing countries, Developed Countries, literature review, management accounting practices

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