Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 2

concept image Related Abstracts

2 Understanding the Polygon with the Eyes of Blinds

Authors: Tuğba Horzum, Ahmet Arikan

Abstract:

This paper was part of a broader study that investigated what blind students (BSs) understood and how they used concept definitions (CDs) and concept images (CIs) for some mathematical concepts. This paper focused on the polygon concept. For this purpose, four open-ended questions were asked to five blind middle school students. During the interviews, BSs were presented with raised-line materials and were given opportunities to construct geometric shapes with magnetic sticks and micro-balls. Qualitative research techniques applied in grounded theory were used for analyzing documents pictures which were taken from magnetic geometric shapes that BSs constructed, raised-line materials and researcher’s observation notes and interviews. At the end of the analysis, it was observed that BSs used mostly their CIs and never took into account the CDs. Besides, BSs encountered with the difficulties associated with the combination of polygon edges’ endpoints consecutively. Additionally, they focused on the interior of the polygon and the angles which have smaller a size. Lastly, BSs were often conflicted about triangle, rectangle, square and circle whether or not a polygon.

Keywords: blind students, concept definition, concept image, polygon

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1 Why and When to Teach Definitions: Necessary and Unnecessary Discontinuities Resulting from the Definition of Mathematical Concepts

Authors: Josephine Shamash, Stuart Smith

Abstract:

We examine reasons for introducing definitions in teaching mathematics in a number of different cases. We try to determine if, where, and when to provide a definition, and which definition to choose. We characterize different types of definitions and the different purposes we may have for formulating them, and detail examples of each type. Giving a definition at a certain stage can sometimes be detrimental to the development of the concept image. In such a case, it is advisable to delay the precise definition to a later stage. We describe two models, the 'successive approximation model', and the 'model of the extending definition' that fit such situations. Detailed examples that fit the different models are given based on material taken from a number of textbooks, and analysis of the way the concept is introduced, and where and how its definition is given. Our conclusions, based on this analysis, is that some of the definitions given may cause discontinuities in the learning sequence and constitute obstacles and unnecessary cognitive conflicts in the formation of the concept definition. However, in other cases, the discontinuity in passing from definition to definition actually serves a didactic purpose, is unavoidable for the mathematical evolution of the concept image, and is essential for students to deepen their understanding.

Keywords: Mathematics Education, Mathematics Teaching, concept image, mathematical definitions

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