Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 7

Comprehension Related Abstracts

7 Classroom Management Whereas Teaching ESL to Saudi Students

Authors: Mohammad Akram

Abstract:

The aim of this study is to improve classroom management while teaching especially ESL/EFL. At the same time, it has been discussed about the standard of the students through some surveys held in Jazan University in the month of February and March, 2013. The present research is a classroom action-oriented study. The subject of the study is mainly the students whose first language is not English at all. The study is prepared in one cycle that has planning, action, and reaction as well. Teachers of English as a second language/foreign language generally face numerous of unexpected problems while dealing with their students. To make the classes practical, meaningful, and easy like fun for the students is really a cumbersome task. It's a very practical move towards classroom ESL/EFL teaching if we want to apply anything new, I mean new policies, tactics, recent/smart teaching methodologies, we must peep into the hole of past because it will give us the best solution for the present strategies. We need to academically study the past of our students to make their present fruitful. Here, author wants to present a few important problematic issues like classroom management in the area of ESL/EFL while teaching ESL students. Impact these are suggestions to combat drawbacks of 'Classroom Teaching'. “Classroom management is to put into practice and a process through teaching and learning process”.

Keywords: Management, Global, Integrated, Teachers, Productive, classroom, Comprehension, perceptions, segregated

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6 Improving Vocabulary and Listening Comprehension via Watching French Films without Subtitles: Positive Results

Authors: Yelena Mazour-Matusevich, Jean-Robert Ancheta

Abstract:

This study is based on more than fifteen years of experience of teaching a foreign language, in my case French, to the English-speaking students. It represents a qualitative research on foreign language learners’ reaction and their gains in terms of vocabulary and listening comprehension through repeatedly viewing foreign feature films with the original sountrack but without English subtitles. The initial idea emerged upon realization that the first challenge faced by my students when they find themselves in a francophone environment has been their lack of listening comprehension. Their inability to understand colloquial speech affects not only their academic performance, but their psychological health as well. To remedy this problem, I have designed and applied for many years my own teaching method based on one particular French film, exceptionally suited, for the reasons described in detail in the paper, for the intermediate-advanced level foreign language learners. This project, conducted together with my undergraduate assistant and mentoree J-R Ancheta, aims at showing how the paralinguistic features, such as characters’ facial expressions, settings, music, historical background, images provided before the actual viewing, etc., offer crucial support and enhance students’ listening comprehension. The study, based on students’ interviews, also offers special pedagogical techniques, such as ‘anticipatory’ vocabulary lists and exercises, drills, quizzes and composition topics that have proven to boost students’ performance. For this study, only the listening proficiency and vocabulary gains of the interviewed participants were assessed.

Keywords: Film, listening, Comprehension, subtitles, vocabulary

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5 Thai Student Ability on Speexx Language Training Program

Authors: Suwaree Yordchim, Toby Gibbs, Glen Craigie

Abstract:

Using the Speexx Online Language Training Program with Thai students has allowed us to evaluate their learning comprehension and track their progression through the English language program. Speexx sets the standard for excellence and innovation in web-based language training and online coaching services. The program is designed to improve the business communication skills of language learners for Thai students. Speexx consists of English lessons, exercises, tests, web boards, and supplementary lessons to help students practice English. The sample groups are 191 Thai sophomores studying Business English with the department of Humanities and Social Science. The data was received by standard deviation (S.D.) value from questionnaires and samples provided from the Speexx training program. The results found that most Thai sophomores fail the Speexx training program due to their learning comprehension of the English language is below average. With persisted efforts on new training methods, the success of the Speexx Language Training Program can break through the cultural barriers and help future students adopt English as a second language. The Speexx results revealed four main factors affecting the success as follows: 1) Future English training should be pursued in applied Speexx development. 2) Thai students didn’t see the benefit of having an Online Language Training Program. 3) There is a great need to educate the next generation of learners on the benefits of Speexx within the community. 4) A great majority of Thai Sophomores didn't know what Speexx was. A guideline for self-reliance planning consisted of four aspects: 1) Development planning: by arranging groups to further improve English abilities with the Speexx Language Training program and encourage using Speexx every day. Local communities need to develop awareness of the usefulness of Speexx and share the value of using the program among family and friends. 2) Humanities and Social Science staff should develop skills using this Online Language Training Program to expand on the benefits of Speexx within their departments. 3) Further research should be pursued on the Thai Students progression with Speexx and how it helps them improve their language skills with Business English. 4) University’s and Language centers should focus on using Speexx to encourage learning for any language, not just English.

Keywords: Comprehension, ability, sophomore, speexx

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4 Investigating the Effect of Juncture on Comprehension among Adult Learners of English in Nigeria

Authors: Emmanuel Uba, Oluwasegun Omidiora, Eugenia Abiodun-Eniayekan

Abstract:

The role of phonology on reading comprehension is long established in the literature. However, the vast majority of studies on the relationship between phonology and reading or comprehension among adults involve investigating the role of intonation, stress, and segmental knowledge on understanding texts. Not much attention is paid to junctural observation and its effect on the interpretation of texts. This study, therefore, presents a preliminary case-study investigation of the effect of juncture on comprehension of texts among adult Nigerian learners of English. Eighty adult learners of English in Nigeria were presented with fifteen seemingly ambiguous sentences to interpret. The sentences were structured in a way that pausing at different points would produce different interpretations. The results reveal that wrong application of pause is capable of affecting comprehension even when other phonological factors such as stress and intonation are observed properly.

Keywords: Phonology, Reading, Comprehension, juncture

Procedia PDF Downloads 161
3 Select Communicative Approaches and Speaking Skills of Junior High School Students

Authors: Sonia Arradaza-Pajaron

Abstract:

Speaking English, as a medium of instruction among students who are non-native English speakers poses a real challenge to achieve proficiency, especially so if it is a requirement in most communicative classroom instruction. It becomes a real burden among students whose English language orientation is not well facilitated and encouraged by teachers among national high schools. This study, which utilized a descriptive-correlational research, examined the relationship between the select communicative approaches commonly utilized in classroom instruction to the level of speaking skills among the identified high school students. Survey questionnaires, interview, and observations sheets were researcher instruments used to generate salient information. Data were analyzed and treated statistically utilizing weighted mean speaking skills levels and Pearson r to determine the relationship between the two identified variables of the study. Findings revealed that the level of English speaking skills of the high school students is just average. Further, among the identified speaking sub-skills, namely, grammar, pronunciation and fluency, the students were considered above average level. There was also a clear relationship of some communicative approaches to the respondents’ speaking skills. Most notable among the select approaches is that of role-playing, compared to storytelling, informal debate, brainstorming, oral reporting, and others. It may be because role-playing is the most commonly used approach in the classroom. This implies that when these high school students are given enough time and autonomy on how they could express their ideas or comprehension of some lessons, they are shown to have a spontaneous manner of expression, through the maximization of the second language. It can be concluded further that high school students have the capacity to express ideas even in the second language, only if they are encouraged and well-facilitated by teachers. Also, when a better communicative approach is identified and better implemented, thus, will level up students’ classroom engagement.

Keywords: Comprehension, speaking skills, communicative approaches, role playing

Procedia PDF Downloads 47
2 Developing the Skills of Reading Comprehension of Learners of English as a Second Language

Authors: Indu Gamage

Abstract:

Though commonly utilized as a language improvement technique, reading has not been fully employed by both language teachers and learners to develop reading comprehension skills in English as a second language. In a Sri Lankan context, this area has to be delved deep into as the learners’ show more propensity to analyze. Reading comprehension is an area that most language teachers and learners struggle with though it appears easy. Most ESL learners engage in reading tasks without being properly aware of the objective of doing reading comprehension. It is observed that when doing reading tasks, the language learners’ concern is more on the meanings of individual words than on the overall comprehension of the given text. The passiveness with which the ESL learners engage themselves in reading comprehension makes reading a tedious task for the learner thereby giving the learner a sense of disappointment at the end. Certain reading tasks take the form of translations. The active cognitive participation of the learner in the mode of using productive strategies for predicting, employing schemata and using contextual clues seems quite less. It was hypothesized that the learners’ lack of knowledge of the productive strategies of reading was the major obstacle that makes reading comprehension a tedious task for them. This study is based on a group of 30 tertiary students who read English only as a fundamental requirement for their degree. They belonged to the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences of the University of Ruhuna, Sri Lanka. Almost all learners hailed from areas where English was hardly utilized in their day to day conversations. The study is carried out in the mode of a questionnaire to check their opinions on reading and a test to check whether the learners are using productive strategies of reading when doing reading comprehension tasks. The test comprised reading questions covering major productive strategies for reading. Then the results were analyzed to see the degree of their active engagement in comprehending the text. The findings depicted the validity of the hypothesis as grounds behind the difficulties related to reading comprehension.

Keywords: Reading, Skills, Comprehension, reading strategies

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1 Driver Readiness in Autonomous Vehicle Take-Overs

Authors: Abdurrahman Arslanyilmaz, Salman Al Matouq, Durmus V. Doner

Abstract:

Level 3 autonomous vehicles are able to take full responsibility over the control of the vehicle unless a system boundary is reached or a system failure occurs, in which case the driver is expected to take-over the control of the vehicle. While this happens, the driver is often not aware of the traffic situation or is engaged in a secondary task. Factors affecting the duration and quality of take-overs in these situations have included secondary task type and nature, traffic density, take-over request (TOR) time, and TOR warning type and modality. However, no prior study examined time buffer for TORs when a system failure occurs immediately before intersections. The first objective of this study is to investigate the effect of time buffer (3, 5, and 7 seconds) on the duration and quality of take-overs when a system failure occurs just prior to intersections. In addition, eye-tracking has become one of the most popular methods to report what individuals view, in what order, for how long, and how often, and the use of it has been researched in driving simulations with various objectives. However, none has compared drivers’ eye gaze behavior in the three different time buffers in order to examine drivers’ attention and comprehension of salient information. The second objective is to understand the driver’s attentional focus on and comprehension of salient traffic related information presented on different parts of the dashboard and on the roads.

Keywords: Attention, autonomous vehicles, Comprehension, driving simulation, eye gaze, take-over duration, take-over quality, time buffer

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