Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 7

Commercialization Related Abstracts

7 Exploitation of Endophytes for the Management of Plant Pathogens

Authors: N. P. Eswara Reddy, S. Thahir Basha

Abstract:

Here, we report the success stories of potential leaf, seed and root endophytes against soil borne as well as foliar plant pathogens which are nutritionally adequate and safe for consumption. Endophytes are the microorganisms that reside asymptomatically in the tissues of higher plants are a robust source of potential biocontrol agents and it is presumed that the survival ability of endophytes may be better when compared to phylloplane microflora. Of all the 68 putative leaf endophytes, the endophytes viz., EB9 (100%), and EB35 (100%) which were superior in controlling Colletotrichum gloeosporioides causing mango anthracnose were identified as Brevundimonas bullata (EB09) and Bacillus thuringiensis (EB35) and further delayed in ripening of mango fruits up to 21 days. As a part, the seed endophyte GSE-4 was identified as Archoromobacter spp. against Sclerotium rolfsii causing stem rot of groundnut and the root endophyte REB-8 against Rhizoctonia bataticola causing dry root rot of chickpea was identified as Bacillus subtilis. Both recorded least percent disease incidence (PDI) and increased plant growth promotion, respectively. Further, the novel Bacillus subtilis (SEB-2) against Macrophomina pahseolina causing charcoal rot of sunflower provides an ample scope for exploring the endophytes at large scale. The talc-based formulations of these endophytes developed can be commercialized after toxicological studies. At the bottom line these unexplored endophytes are the need of the hour against aggressive plant pathogens and to maintain the quality and abundance of food and feed and also to fetch marginal economy to the farmers will be discussed.

Keywords: Endophytes, Commercialization, Plant Pathogens, abundance of food

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6 Problems of Innovation Development of Wireless Data Transfer Branch in the Cellular Market of Kazakhstan

Authors: Yessengeldy Kuanyshpayev

Abstract:

Now in some countries of the world the cellular market is on the point of saturation, in others - positive dynamics of development kept on. The reasons for it are also different, but there are united by their general susceptibility to innovation changes, if they are really innovative. If to take as an example the cellular market of Kazakhstan it is defined by the low percent of smart phones at consumers, the low population density, undercapacity of the 3G channel, and absence of universal access to the LTE technology that limits dynamical growth of this branch. These moments are aggravated by failures of starting commercial projects by private companies which prevent to be implemented and widely adopted to a new product among consumers. The object of the research is possible integration of wireless and program technologies at which introduction the idea can regenerate in an innovation. The analysis of existing projects in the market and the possible union of the technologies through a prism of theoretical bases of innovative activity shows that efficiency of the company by development and introduction of innovations is possible only thanks to strict observance of all terms and conditions of the innovative process which main term is profit. Despite that fact that on a global scale the innovativeness issue of companies is very popular, there are no research about possibility of innovative breaks in the field of wireless access to the Internet in the cellular market of Kazakhstan.

Keywords: Innovation, Commercialization, the effectiveness of company, cellular market

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5 Commercialization of Research Outputs in Kenyan Universities

Authors: John Ayisi, Gideon M. Kivengea, George A. Ombakho

Abstract:

In this emerging era of knowledge economy, universities, as major centres of learning and research, are becoming increasingly important as sources of ideas, knowledge, skills, innovation and technological advances. These ideas can be turned into new products, processes and systems needed to drive their respective national economies, and thus placing universities at the centre of the national innovation systems. Thus, commercialization of research outputs from universities to industry has become an area of strong policy interest in African countries. To assess the level of commercialization of research outputs in Kenyan universities, a standardized questionnaire covering seven sub-sections, namely: University Commercialization Environment, Management of Commercialization Activities, Commercialization Office, Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs), Early Stage Financing and Venture Capital; Industrial Linkages; and Technology Parks and Incubators was administered among a few selected public and private universities. Results show that all the universities have a strategic plan; though not all have innovation and commercialization as part of it. Half the nineteen surveyed universities indicated they have created designated offices for fostering commercialization. Majority have guidelines on IPRs which advocate IP to be co-owned by researcher/university. University-industry linkages are weak. Most universities are taking precursory steps to incentivise and encourage entrepreneurial activities among their academic staff and students, even though the level of resources devoted to them is low. It is recommended that building capacity in entrepreneurship among staff and students and committing more resources to R&D activities hold potential to increased commercialization of university research outputs.

Keywords: Knowledge, R&D, Commercialization, University

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4 Liability Aspects Related to Genetically Modified Food under the Food Safety Legislation in India

Authors: S. K. Balashanmugam, Padmavati Manchikanti, S. R. Subramanian

Abstract:

The question of legal liability over injury arising out of the import and the introduction of GM food emerges as a crucial issue confronting to promote GM food and its derivatives. There is a greater possibility of commercialized GM food from the exporting country to enter importing country where status of approval shall not be same. This necessitates the importance of fixing a liability mechanism to discuss the damage, if any, occurs at the level of transboundary movement or at the market. There was a widespread consensus to develop the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety and to give for a dedicated regime on liability and redress in the form of Nagoya Kuala Lumpur Supplementary Protocol on the Liability and Redress (‘N-KL Protocol’) at the international context. The national legal frameworks based on this protocol are not adequately established in the prevailing food legislations of the developing countries. The developing economy like India is willing to import GM food and its derivatives after the successful commercialization of Bt Cotton in 2002. As a party to the N-KL Protocol, it is indispensable for India to formulate a legal framework and to discuss safety, liability, and regulatory issues surrounding GM foods in conformity to the provisions of the Protocol. The liability mechanism is also important in the case where the risk assessment and risk management is still in implementing stage. Moreover, the country is facing GM infiltration issues with its neighbors Bangladesh. As a precautionary approach, there is a need to formulate rules and procedure of legal liability to discuss any kind of damage occurs at transboundary trade. In this context, the proposed work will attempt to analyze the liability regime in the existing Food Safety and Standards Act, 2006 from the applicability and domestic compliance and to suggest legal and policy options for regulatory authorities.

Keywords: Food Safety, Liability, Commercialization, Genetically modified foods, India, FSSAI

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3 Assessment of Barriers to the Clinical Adoption of Cell-Based Therapeutics

Authors: David Pettitt, Benjamin Davies, Georg Holländer, David Brindley

Abstract:

Cellular based therapies, whose origins can be traced from the intertwined concepts of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, have the potential to transform the current medical landscape and offer an approach to managing what were once considered untreatable diseases. However, despite a large increase in basic science activity in the cell therapy arena alongside a growing portfolio of cell therapy trials, the number of industry products available for widespread clinical use correlates poorly with such a magnitude of activity, with the number of cell-based therapeutics in mainstream use remaining comparatively low. This research serves to quantitatively assess the barriers to the clinical adoption of cell-based therapeutics through identification of unique barriers, specific challenges and opportunities facing the development and adoption of such therapies.

Keywords: Translation, Cell Therapy, Commercialization, clinical adoption

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2 A Software Product Engineering Process for Commercial Success in Start-Up and Cases

Authors: Javed Ahsan

Abstract:

Software engineers strive for technical sophistication with a dream of finding commercial success in their start-up business. But they may find their much technically sophisticated software products failing in industry in competition with lesser sophisticated products. This is because of not maintaining a clear focus on complimenting and leading commercial success through technical sophistication. This can be achieved through a software engineering specific product development process suggested in this paper. This process is about evolving a software product through specific phases and iterations until commercial triumph falls on software engineer’s feet.

Keywords: software, Product, Engineering, Industry, Competitiveness, Commercialization, start-up

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1 Accelerating Malaysian Technology Startups: Case Study of Malaysian Technology Development Corporation as the Innovator

Authors: Norhalim Yunus, Mohamad Husaini Dahalan, Nor Halina Ghazali

Abstract:

Building technology start-ups from ground zero into world-class companies in form and substance present a rare opportunity for government-affiliated institutions in Malaysia. The challenge of building such start-ups becomes tougher when their core businesses involve commercialization of unproven technologies for the mass market. These simple truths, while difficult to execute, will go a long way in getting a business off the ground and flying high. Malaysian Technology Development Corporation (MTDC), a company founded to facilitate the commercial exploitation of R&D findings from research institutions and universities, and eventually help translate these findings of applications in the marketplace, is an excellent case in point. The purpose of this paper is to examine MTDC as an institution as it explores the concept of ‘it takes a village to raise a child’ in an effort to create and nurture start-ups into established world class Malaysian technology companies. With MTDC at the centre of Malaysia's innovative start-ups, the analysis seeks to specifically answer two questions: How has the concept been applied in MTDC? and what can we learn from this successful case? A key aim is to elucidate how MTDC's journey as a private limited company can help leverage reforms and achieve transformation, a process that might be suitable for other small, open, third world and developing countries. This paper employs a single case study, designed to acquire an in-depth understanding of how MTDC has developed and grown technology start-ups to world-class technology companies. The case study methodology is employed as the focus is on a contemporary phenomenon within a real business context. It also explains the causal links in real-life situations where a single survey or experiment is unable to unearth. The findings show that MTDC maximises the concept of it needs a village to raise a child in totality, as MTDC itself assumes the role of the innovator to 'raise' start-up companies into world-class stature. As the innovator, MTDC creates shared value and leadership, introduces innovative programmes ahead of the curve, mobilises talents for optimum results and aggregates knowledge for personnel advancement. The success of the company's effort is attributed largely to leadership, visionary, adaptability, commitment to innovate, partnership and networking, and entrepreneurial drive. The findings of this paper are however limited by the single case study of MTDC. Future research is required to study more cases of success or/and failure where the concept of it takes a village to raise a child have been explored and applied.

Keywords: Technology Transfer, Commercialization, Start-Ups, technology incubator

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