Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 2

Cliques Related Abstracts

2 The Analysis of Split Graphs in Social Networks Based on the k-Cardinality Assignment Problem

Authors: Ivan Belik

Abstract:

In terms of social networks split graphs correspond to the variety of interpersonal and intergroup relations. In this paper we analyse the interaction between the cliques (socially strong and trusty groups) and the independent sets (fragmented and non-connected groups of people) as the basic components of any split graph. Based on the Semi-Lagrangean relaxation for the k-cardinality assignment problem we show the way of how to minimize the socially risky interactions between the cliques and the independent sets within the social network.

Keywords: Social Networks, Cliques, independent sets, k-cardinality assignment, split graphs

Procedia PDF Downloads 158
1 Natural Emergence of a Core Structure in Networks via Clique Percolation

Authors: A. Melka, N. Slater, A. Mualem, Y. Louzoun

Abstract:

Networks are often presented as containing a “core” and a “periphery.” The existence of a core suggests that some vertices are central and form the skeleton of the network, to which all other vertices are connected. An alternative view of graphs is through communities. Multiple measures have been proposed for dense communities in graphs, the most classical being k-cliques, k-cores, and k-plexes, all presenting groups of tightly connected vertices. We here show that the edge number thresholds for such communities to emerge and for their percolation into a single dense connectivity component are very close, in all networks studied. These percolating cliques produce a natural core and periphery structure. This result is generic and is tested in configuration models and in real-world networks. This is also true for k-cores and k-plexes. Thus, the emergence of this connectedness among communities leading to a core is not dependent on some specific mechanism but a direct result of the natural percolation of dense communities.

Keywords: Phase Transition, Cliques, percolation, core structure

Procedia PDF Downloads 28