Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

classroom practice Related Abstracts

3 How to Change Things When Change is Hard: Beyond Teaching Facts, How Can English Language Teachers Train Students to Use the 21st Century Skills

Authors: Hameda Suwaed

Abstract:

In today's world, knowledge and information are increasing in a way that no one can learn everything about every subject and the jobs that students will get after graduation may not yet exist. Therefore, teaching them just facts without teaching them how to use the facts in real life, how to work in a team and how to think critically is no longer enough. In Libya, a country characterized by using traditional methods of teaching, how can English language teachers train students to use such skills? And what type of activities and adaptations to classroom teaching methods will be necessary to do this? Using action research and classroom research gathered data, this study adjusts Heath's (2010) model of change that includes giving students clear directions, sufficient motivation and supportive environment. These steps were applied by encouraging students to participate actively in the classroom by using group work and variety of activities to train them how to find, interpret and use information. The findings of the study showed that following the suggested model can broaden students' perspectives on studying in their environment starting with their classroom and ending with their country. In conclusion, although this was a small scale study, the students' participation in the classroom shows that they gained self confidence in using practices such as group work, critical thinking, time management, creativity and how to present their ideas and accepting different opinions. What was remarkable is that most students were aware that is what we need in Libya nowadays.

Keywords: Change, Skills, Libya, group work, classroom practice

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2 Moving from Practice to Theory

Authors: Maria Lina Garrido

Abstract:

This paper aims to reflect upon instruction in English classes with the specific purpose of reading comprehension development, having as its paradigm the considerations presented by William Grabe, in his book Reading in a Second Language: Moving from theory to practice. His concerns regarding the connection between research findings and instructional practices have stimulated the present author to re-evaluate both her long practice as an English reading teacher and as the author of two reading textbooks for graduate students. Elements of the reading process such as linguistic issues, prior knowledge, reading strategies, critical evaluation, and motivation are the main foci of this analysis as far as the activities developed in the classroom are concerned. The experience with university candidates on postgraduate courses with different levels of English knowledge in Bahia, Brazil, has definitely demanded certain adjustments to this author`s classroom setting. Word recognition based on cognates, for example, has been emphasized given the fact that academic texts use many Latin words which have the same roots as the Brazilian Portuguese lexicon. Concerning syntactic parsing, the tenses/verbal aspects, modality and linking words are included in the curriculum, but not with the same depth as the general English curricula. Reading strategies, another essential predictor for developing reading skills, have been largely stimulated in L2 classes in order to compensate for a lack of the appropriate knowledge of the foreign language. This paper presents results that demonstrate that this author`s teaching practice is compatible with the implications and instruction concerning the reading process outlined by Grabe, however, it admits that each class demands specific instructions to meet the needs of that particular group.

Keywords: reading comprehension, reading skills, classroom practice, instructional activities

Procedia PDF Downloads 346
1 Structuring Taiwanese Elementary School English Teachers' Professional Dialogue about Teaching and Learning through Protocols

Authors: Chin-Wen Chien

Abstract:

Protocols are tools that help teachers inquire into the teaching and professional learning during the professional dialogue. This study focused on the integration of protocols into elementary school English teachers’ professional dialogue and discussed the influence of protocols on teachers’ teaching and learning. Based on the analysis of documents, observations, and interviews, this study concluded that with the introduction of protocols to elementary school English teachers, three major protocols were used during their professional dialogue. These protocols led the teachers to gain professional learning in content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge. However, the facilitators’ lack of experience in using protocols led to interruptions during the professional dialogue. Suggestions for effective protocol-based professional dialogue are provided.

Keywords: Protocols, Professional Learning, classroom practice, professional dialogue

Procedia PDF Downloads 225