Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

calcium oxide Related Abstracts

3 The Effect of CaO Addition on Mechanical Properties of Ceramic Tiles

Authors: Lucie Vodova, Radomir Sokolar, Jitka Hroudova

Abstract:

Stoneware clay, fired clay (as a grog), calcite waste and class C fly ash in various mixing rations were the basic raw materials for the mixture for production of dry pressed ceramic tiles. Mechanical properties (water absorption, bulk density, apparent porosity, flexural strength) as well as mineralogical composition were studied on samples with different source of calcium oxide after firing at 900, 1000, 1100 and 1200°C. It was found that samples with addition of calcite waste contain dmisteinbergit and anorthite. This minerals help to improve the strength of the body and reduce porosity fired at lower temperatures. Class C fly ash has not significantly influence on properties of the fired body as calcite waste.

Keywords: ceramic tiles, class C fly ash, calcite waste, calcium oxide, anorthite

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2 Thermal Decomposition Behaviors of Hexafluoroethane (C2F6) Using Zeolite/Calcium Oxide Mixtures

Authors: Kazunori Takai, Weng Kaiwei, Sadao Araki, Hideki Yamamoto

Abstract:

HFC and PFC gases have been commonly and widely used as refrigerant of air conditioner and as etching agent of semiconductor manufacturing process, because of their higher heat of vaporization and chemical stability. On the other hand, HFCs and PFCs gases have the high global warming effect on the earth. Therefore, we have to be decomposed these gases emitted from chemical apparatus like as refrigerator. Until now, disposal of these gases were carried out by using combustion method like as Rotary kiln treatment mainly. However, this treatment needs extremely high temperature over 1000 °C. In the recent year, in order to reduce the energy consumption, a hydrolytic decomposition method using catalyst and plasma decomposition treatment have been attracted much attention as a new disposal treatment. However, the decomposition of fluorine-containing gases under the wet condition is not able to avoid the generation of hydrofluoric acid. Hydrofluoric acid is corrosive gas and it deteriorates catalysts in the decomposition process. Moreover, an additional process for the neutralization of hydrofluoric acid is also indispensable. In this study, the decomposition of C2F6 using zeolite and zeolite/CaO mixture as reactant was evaluated in the dry condition at 923 K. The effect of the chemical structure of zeolite on the decomposition reaction was confirmed by using H-Y, H-Beta, H-MOR and H-ZSM-5. The formation of CaF2 in zeolite/CaO mixtures after the decomposition reaction was confirmed by XRD measurements. The decomposition of C2F6 using zeolite as reactant showed the closely similar behaviors regardless the type of zeolite (MOR, Y, ZSM-5, Beta type). There was no difference of XRD patterns of each zeolite before and after reaction. On the other hand, the difference in the C2F6 decomposition for each zeolite/CaO mixtures was observed. These results suggested that the rate-determining process for the C2F6 decomposition on zeolite alone is the removal of fluorine from reactive site. In other words, the C2F6 decomposition for the zeolite/CaO improved compared with that for the zeolite alone by the removal of the fluorite from reactive site. HMOR/CaO showed 100% of the decomposition for 3.5 h and significantly improved from zeolite alone. On the other hand, Y type zeolite showed no improvement, that is, the almost same value of Y type zeolite alone. The descending order of C2F6 decomposition was MOR, ZSM-5, beta and Y type zeolite. This order is similar to the acid strength characterized by NH3-TPD. Hence, it is considered that the C-F bond cleavage is closely related to the acid strength.

Keywords: Zeolite, Decomposition, calcium oxide, hexafluoroethane

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1 Effect of Liquid Additive on Dry Grinding for Desired Surface Structure of CaO Catalyst

Authors: Wiyanti Fransisca Simanullang, Shinya Yamanaka

Abstract:

Grinding method was used to control the active site and to improve the specific surface area (SSA) of calcium oxide (CaO) derived from scallop shell as a sustainable resource. The dry grinding of CaO with acetone and tertiary butanol as a liquid additive was carried out using a planetary ball mill with a laboratory scale. The experiments were operated by stepwise addition with time variations to determine the grinding limit. The active site of CaO was measured by X-Ray Diffraction and FT-IR. The SSA variations of products with grinding time were measured by BET method. The morphology structure of CaO was observed by SEM. The use of liquid additive was effective for increasing the SSA and controlling the active site of CaO. SSA of CaO was increased in proportion to the amount of the liquid additive and the grinding time. The performance of CaO as a solid base catalyst for biodiesel production was tested in the transesterification reaction of used cooking oil to produce fatty acid methyl ester (FAME).

Keywords: Grinding, calcium oxide, specific surface area, active site

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