Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 5

boron carbide Related Abstracts

5 An Analytical Systematic Design Approach to Evaluate Ballistic Performance of Armour Grade AA7075 Aluminium Alloy Using Friction Stir Processing

Authors: Lahari Ramya Pa, Sudhakar Ib, Madhu Vc, Madhusudhan Reddy Gd, Srinivasa Rao E.

Abstract:

Selection of suitable armor materials for defense applications is very crucial with respect to increasing mobility of the systems as well as maintaining safety. Therefore, determining the material with the lowest possible areal density that resists the predefined threat successfully is required in armor design studies. A number of light metal and alloys are come in to forefront especially to substitute the armour grade steels. AA5083 aluminium alloy which fit in to the military standards imposed by USA army is foremost nonferrous alloy to consider for possible replacement of steel to increase the mobility of armour vehicles and enhance fuel economy. Growing need of AA5083 aluminium alloy paves a way to develop supplement aluminium alloys maintaining the military standards. It has been witnessed that AA 2xxx aluminium alloy, AA6xxx aluminium alloy and AA7xxx aluminium alloy are the potential material to supplement AA5083 aluminium alloy. Among those cited aluminium series alloys AA7xxx aluminium alloy (heat treatable) possesses high strength and can compete with armour grade steels. Earlier investigations revealed that layering of AA7xxx aluminium alloy can prevent spalling of rear portion of armour during ballistic impacts. Hence, present investigation deals with fabrication of hard layer (made of boron carbide) i.e. layer on AA 7075 aluminium alloy using friction stir processing with an intention of blunting the projectile in the initial impact and backing tough portion(AA7xxx aluminium alloy) to dissipate residual kinetic energy. An analytical approach has been adopted to unfold the ballistic performance of projectile. Penetration of projectile inside the armour has been resolved by considering by strain energy model analysis. Perforation shearing areas i.e. interface of projectile and armour is taken in to account for evaluation of penetration inside the armour. Fabricated surface composites (targets) were tested as per the military standard (JIS.0108.01) in a ballistic testing tunnel at Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL), Hyderabad in standardized testing conditions. Analytical results were well validated with experimental obtained one.

Keywords: AA7075 aluminium alloy, friction stir processing, boron carbide, ballistic performance, target

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4 Low-Temperature Fabrication of Reaction Bonded Composites, Based on Sic and (Sic+B4C) Mixture, Infiltrated with Si-Al Alloy

Authors: Helen Dilman, Eyal Oz, Shmuel Hayun, Nahum Frage

Abstract:

The conventional approach for manufacturing silicon carbide and boron carbide reaction bonded composites is based on infiltrating a ceramic porous preform with molten silicon. The relatively high melting temperature of the silicon infiltrating medium is a drawback of the process. The present contribution is concerned with an approach that allows obtaining reaction bonded composites by pressure-less infiltration at a significantly lower (850-1000oC) temperature range. This approach was applied for the fabrication of fully dense SiC/(Si-Al) and (SiC+B4C)/(Si-Al) composites. The key feature of the approach is based on using Si alloys with low melting temperature and the Mg-vapor atmosphere, under which an adequate wetting between ceramics and liquid alloys for the infiltration process is achieved. In the first set of the experiments ceramic performs compacted from multimodal SiC powders (with the green density of about 27 vol. %) without free carbon addition were infiltrated by Si-20%Al alloy at 950oC. In the second set, 19 vol. % of a fine boron carbide powder was added to SiC powders as a source of carbon. The green density of the SiC-B4C preforms was about 23-25 vol. %. In both cases, successful infiltration was achieved and the composites were fully dense. The density of the composites was about 3g/cm3. For the SiC based composites the hardness value was 750±150HV, Young modulus-280GPa and bending strength-240±30MPa. These values for (SiC-B4C)/(Si-Al) composites (1460±200HV, 317GPa and 360±20MPa) were significantly higher due to the formation of novel ceramics phases. Microstructural characteristics of the composites and their phase composition will be discussed.

Keywords: Composites, Silicon Carbide, Low Temperatures, infiltration, boron carbide

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3 Development and Analysis of SFR Control Rod Design

Authors: Jan Hascik, Lenka Dujčíková, Laurent Buiron

Abstract:

The study is dedicated to safety management of SFR CAPRA core with CFV design improvements. In the case of CAPRA core, demands for reactivity control are higher than for reference core. There are two possible ways how to ensure the certain amount of negative reactivity. One option is to boost control rods worth. The Greater part of the study is aimed at the proposal of appropriate control rod design. At first, the European Fast Reactor (EFR) control rod design with high-enriched boron carbide B4C as absorber material was tested. Considering costly and difficult enrichment process, usage of natural boron carbide absorbator is desired. Obviously, the use of natural boron leads to CR worth reduction. In order to increase it to required value, moderator material was inserted inside the control rod. Various materials and geometric configurations were examined to find optimal solution corresponding with EFR based CR worth value.

Keywords: boron carbide, CAPRA core, control rod design, low void effect design, melting temperature, moderator material

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2 Electroless Nickel Boron Deposition onto the SiC and B4C Ceramic Reinforced Materials

Authors: I. Kerti, G. Sezen, S. Daglilar

Abstract:

This present work is focused on studying to improve low wetting behaviour between liquid metal and ceramic particles. Ceramic particles like SiC and B4C have attracted great attention because of their usability as reinforcement for composite materials. However, poor wettability of particles is one of the major drawbacks of metal matrix composite production. Various methods have been studied to enhance the wetting properties between ceramic materials and metal substrates during ceramic reinforced metal matrix composites. Among these methods, autocatalytic nickel deposition is a unique process for the enhancement of the surface properties of ceramic particles. In fact, it is difficult to obtain continuous and uniform metallic coating on ceramic powders. In this study deposition of nickel boron layer on ceramic particles via autocatalytic plating in borohydride baths were investigated. Firstly, powders with different particle sizes were sensitized and activated respectively in order to ensure catalytic properties. Following the pre-treatment operations, particles were transferred into the coating bath containing nickel sulphate or nickel chloride as the Ni2+ source. The results show that a better bonding and uniform coating layer were obtained for Ni-B coatings with the Ni2+ source of NiCl2.6H2O as compared to NiSO4.6H2O. With the progress of the time, both particle surfaces are completely covered by a continuous and thin nickel boron layer. The surface morphology of the coatings that were analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show that SiC and B4C particles both distributed and different thickness of Ni-B nanolayers have been successfully coated onto the particles. The particles were mounted into a polimeric resin and polished in order to observe the thickness and the continuity of the coating layer. The composition of the coating layers were also evaluated by EDS analyses. The SEM morphologies and the EDS results of the coatings at different reaction times were adopted for detailed discussion of the Ni-B electroless plating mechanism.

Keywords: Silicon Carbide, boron carbide, electroless coating, nickel boron deposition

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1 Effect of Alloying Elements on Particle Incorporation of Boron Carbide Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites

Authors: Steven Ploetz, Andreas Lohmueller, Robert F. Singer

Abstract:

The outstanding performance of aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) regarding stiffness/weight ratio makes AMCs attractive material for lightweight construction. Low-density boride compounds promise simultaneously an increase in stiffness and decrease in composite density. This is why boron carbide is chosen for composite manufacturing. The composites are fabricated with the stir casting process. To avoid gas entrapment during mixing and ensure nonporous composites, partial vacuum is adapted during particle feeding and stirring. Poor wettability of boron carbide with liquid aluminum hinders particle incorporation, but alloying elements such as magnesium and titanium could improve wettability and thus particle incorporation. Next to alloying elements, adapted stirring parameters and impeller geometries improve particle incorporation and enable homogenous particle distribution and high particle volume fractions of boron carbide. AMCs with up to 15 vol.% of boron carbide particles are produced via melt stirring, resulting in an increase in stiffness and strength.

Keywords: Stiffness, aluminum matrix composites, boron carbide, stir casting

Procedia PDF Downloads 185