Commenced in January 2007
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Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

Acinetobacter baumannii Related Abstracts

3 Structural and Binding Studies of Peptidyl-tRNA Hydrolase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Provide a Platform for the Structure Based Inhibitor Design against Peptidyl-tRNA Hydrolase

Authors: Pradeep Sharma, Sujata Sharma, Avinash Singh, Lovely Gautam, Mau Sinha, Asha Bhushan, Punit Kaur, Tej P. Singh

Abstract:

Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (Pth) Pth is an essential bacterial enzyme that catalyzes the release of free tRNA and peptide moeities from peptidyl tRNAs during stalling of protein synthesis. In order to design inhibitors of Pth from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PaPth), we have determined the structures of PaPth in its native state and in the bound states with two compounds, amino acylate-tRNA analogue (AAtA) and 5-azacytidine (AZAC). The peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was amplified by Phusion High-Fidelity DNA Polymerase using forward and reverse primers, respectively. The E. coliBL21 (λDE3) strain was used for expression of the recombinant peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The protein was purified using a Ni-NTA superflow column. The crystallization experiments were carried out using hanging drop vapour diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 1.50 Å resolution. The data were processed using HKL-2000. The polypeptide chain of PaPth consists of 194 amino acid residues from Met1 to Ala194. The centrally located β-structure is surrounded by α-helices from all sides except the side that has entrance to the substrate binding site. The structures of the complexes of PaPth with AAtA and AZAC showed the ligands bound to PaPth in the substrate binding cleft and interacted with protein atoms extensively. The residues that formed intermolecular hydrogen bonds with the atoms of AAtA included Asn12, His22, Asn70, Gly113, Asn116, Ser148, and Glu161 of the symmetry related molecule. The amino acids that were involved in hydrogen bonded interactions in case of AZAC included, His22, Gly113, Asn116, and Ser148. As indicated by fittings of two ligands and the number of interactions made by them with protein atoms, AAtA appears to be a more compatible with the structure of the substrate binding cleft. However, there is a further scope to achieve a better stacking than that of O-tyrosyl moiety because it is not still ideally stacked. These observations about the interactions between the protein and ligands have provided the information about the mode of binding of ligands, nature and number of interactions. This information may be useful for the design of tight inhibitors of Pth enzymes.

Keywords: peptidyl tRNA hydrolase, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pth enzymes, O-tyrosyl

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2 Biodegradation of Malathion by Acinetobacter baumannii Strain AFA Isolated from Domestic Sewage in Egypt

Authors: Ahmed F. Azmy, Amal E. Saafan, Tamer M. Essam, Magdy A. Amin, Shaban H. Ahmed

Abstract:

Bacterial strains capable of degradation of malathion from the domestic sewage were isolated by an enrichment culture technique. Three bacterial strains were screened and identified as Acinetobacter baumannii (AFA), Pseudomonas aeruginosae (PS1),andPseudomonas mendocina (PS2) based on morphological, biochemical identification and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Acinetobacter baumannii AFA was the most efficient malathion degrading bacterium, so used for further biodegradation study. AFA was able to grow in mineral salt medium (MSM) supplemented with malathion (100 mg/l) as a sole carbon source, and within 14 days, 84% of the initial dose was degraded by the isolate measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Strain AFA could also degrade other organophosphorus compounds including diazenon, chlorpyrifos and fenitrothion. The effect of different culture conditions on the degradation of malathion like inoculum density, other carbon or nitrogen sources, temperature and shaking were examined. Degradation of malathion and bacterial cell growth were accelerated when culture media were supplemented with yeast extract, glucose and citrate. The optimum conditions for malathion degradation by strain AFA were; an inoculum density of 1.5x 1012CFU/ml at 30°C with shaking. A specific polymerase chain reaction primers were designed manually using multiple sequence alignment of the corresponding carboxylesterase enzymes of Acinetobacter species. Sequencing result of amplified PCR product and phylogenetic analysis showed low degree of homology with the other carboxylesterase enzymes of Acinetobacter strains, so we suggested that this enzyme is a novel esterase enzyme. Isolated bacterial strains may have potential role for use in bioremediation of malathion contaminated.

Keywords: biodegradation, Acinetobacter baumannii, malathion, organophosphate pesticides

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1 Identification and Antibiotic Resistance Rates of Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated from the Respiratory Tract Samples, Obtained from the Different Intensive Care Units

Authors: Recep Kesli, Gulşah Asik, Cengiz Demir, Onur Turkyilmaz

Abstract:

Objective: Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) can cause health-care associated infections, such as bacteremia, urinary tract and wound infections, endocarditis, meningitis, and pneumonia, particularly in intensive care unit patients. In this study, we aimed to evaluate A. baumannii production in sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage and susceptibilities for antibiotics in a 24 months period. Methods: Between October 2013 and September 2015, Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from respiratory tract speciments were evaluated retrospectively. The strains were isolated from the different intensive care units patients. A. baumannii strains were identified by both the conventional methods and aoutomated identification system -VITEK 2 (bio-Merieux, Marcy l’etoile, France). Antibiotic resistance testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method according to CLSI criteria. Results: All the ninety isolates included in the study were from respiratory tract specimens. While of all the isolated 90 Acinetobacter baumannii strains were found to be resistant (100%), against ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin and piperacillin/ tazobactam, resistance rates against other tested antibiotics found as follows; meropenem 77, 86%, imipenem 75, 83%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-STX) 69, 76,6%, gentamicin 51, 56,6% and amikacin 48, 53,3%. Colistin was found as the most effective antibiotic against Acinetobacter baumannii, and there were not found any resistant (0%) strain against colistin. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the no resistance was found in Acinetobacter baumannii against to colistin. High rates of resistance to carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem) and other tested antibiotics (ceftiaxone, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacine, piperacilline-tazobactam, TMP-STX gentamicin and amikacin) also have remarkable resistance rates. There was a significant relationship between demographic features of patients such as age, undergoing mechanical ventilation, length of hospital stay with resistance rates. High resistance rates against antibiotics require implementation of the infection control program and rational use of antibiotics. In the present study, while there were not found colistin resistance, panresistance were found against to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin and piperacillin/ tazobactam.

Keywords: Antibiotic Resistance, Acinetobacter baumannii, intensive care unit, multi drug resistance

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