Dr. Soudabeh Shafiee Ardestani

Committee: International Scientific Committee of Medical and Health Sciences
University: Tehran University of Medical Science
Department:
Research Fields: procedural sedation and analgesia, thiopental, fentanyl, midazolam, orthopedic procedure, emergency department, pain,

Publications

1 Thiopental-Fentanyl versus Midazolam-Fentanyl for Emergency Department Procedural Sedation and Analgesia in Patients with Shoulder Dislocation and Distal Radial Fracture-Dislocation: A Randomized Double-Blind Controlled Trial

Authors: D. Farsi, Gh. Dokhtvasi, S. Abbasi, S. Shafiee Ardestani, E. Payani

Abstract:

Background and aim: It has not been well studied whether fentanyl-thiopental (FT) is effective and safe for PSA in orthopedic procedures in Emergency Department (ED). The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of intravenous FT versus fentanyl-midazolam (FM) in patients who suffered from shoulder dislocation or distal radial fracture-dislocation. Methods: In this randomized double-blinded study, Seventy-six eligible patients were entered the study and randomly received intravenous FT or FM. The success rate, onset of action and recovery time, pain score, physicians’ satisfaction and adverse events were assessed and recorded by treating emergency physicians. The statistical analysis was intention to treat. Results: The success rate after administrating loading dose in FT group was significantly higher than FM group (71.7% vs. 48.9%, p=0.04); however, the ultimate unsuccessful rate after 3 doses of drugs in the FT group was higher than the FM group (3 to 1) but it did not reach to significant level (p=0.61). Despite near equal onset of action time in two study group (P=0.464), the recovery period in patients receiving FT was markedly shorter than FM group (P<0.001). The occurrence of adverse effects was low in both groups (p=0.31). Conclusion: PSA using FT is effective and appears to be safe for orthopedic procedures in the ED. Therefore, regarding the prompt onset of action, short recovery period of thiopental, it seems that this combination can be considered more for performing PSA in orthopedic procedures in ED.

Keywords: Pain, procedural sedation and analgesia, thiopental, fentanyl, midazolam, orthopedic procedure, Emergency Department

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Abstracts

4 Oral Betahistine Versus Intravenous Diazepam in Acute Peripheral Vertigo: A Randomized, Double-Blind Controlled Trial

Authors: Soudabeh Shafiee Ardestani, Saeed Abbasi, Neda Valizadeh, Davood Farsi

Abstract:

Objectives: Peripheral vertigo is a common complaint of patients who are visited in emergency departments. In our study, we wanted to evaluate the effect of betahistine as an oral drug vs. intravenous diazepam for the treatment of acute peripheral vertigo. We also wanted to see the possibility of substitution of parenteral drug with an oral one with fewer side effects. Materials and Methods: In this randomized, double-blind study, 101 patients were enrolled in the study. The patients were divided in two groups in a double-blind randomized manner. Group A took oral placebo and 10 mg of intravenous diazepam. Group B received 8mg of oral betahistine and intravenous placebo. Patients’ symptoms and signs (Vertigo severity, Nausea, Vomiting, Nistagmus and Gate) were evaluated after 0, 2, 4, 6 hours by emergency physicians and data were collected by a questionnaire. Results: In both groups, there was significant improvement in vertigo (betahistine group P=0.02 and Diazepam group P=0.03). Analysis showed more improvement in vertigo severity after 4 hours of treatment in betahistine group comparing to diazepam group (P=0.02). Nausea and vomiting were significantly lower in patients receiving diazepam after 2 and 6 hours (P=0.02 & P=0.03).No statistically significant differences were found between the groups in nistagmus, equilibrium & vertigo duration. Conclusion: The results of this randomized trial showed that both drugs had acceptable therapeutic effects in peripheral vertigo, although betahistine was significantly more efficacious after 4 hours of drug intake. As for higher nausea and vomiting in betahistine group, physician should consider these side effects before drug prescription.

Keywords: Emergency Department, diazepam, acute peripheral vertigo, betahistine

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3 Procalcitonin and Other Biomarkers in Sepsis Patients: A Prospective Study

Authors: Soudabeh Shafiee Ardestani, Neda Valizadeh, Arvin Najafi

Abstract:

Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the association of mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MRproANP), procalcitonin (PCT), proendothelin-1 (proET-1) levels with sepsis severity in Emergency ward patients. Materials and Methods: We assessed the predictive value of MRproANP, PCT, copeptin, and proET-1 in early sepsis among patients referring to the emergency ward with a suspected sepsis. Results-132 patients were enrolled in this study. 45 (34%) patients had a final diagnosis of sepsis. A higher percentage of patients with definite sepsis had systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria at initial visit in comparison with no-sepsis patients (P<0.05) and were admitted to the hospital (P<0.05). PCT levels were higher in sepsis patients [P<0.05]. There was no significant differences for MRproANP or proET-1 in sepsis patients (P=0.47). Conclusion: A combination of SIRS criteria and PCT levels is beneficial for the early sepsis diagnosis in emergency ward patients with a suspicious infection disease.

Keywords: Biomarkers, Emergency, sepsis, prolactin

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2 Opioid Administration on Patients Hospitalized in the Emergency Department

Authors: Soudabeh Shafiee Ardestani, Neda Valizadeh, Mani Mofidi, Ali Hashemaghaee, Mona Hashemaghaee

Abstract:

Background: Acute pain and its management remained the most complaint of emergency service admission. Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures add to patients’ pain. Diminishing the pain increases the quality of patient’s feeling and improves the patient-physician relationship. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes and side effects of opioid administration in emergency patients. Material and Methods: patients admitted to ward II emergency service of Imam Khomeini hospital, who received one of the opioids: morphine, pethidine, methadone or fentanyl as an analgesic were evaluated. Their vital signs and general condition were examined before and after drug injection. Also, patient’s pain experience were recorded as numerical rating score (NRS) before and after analgesic administration. Results: 268 patients were studied. 34 patients were addicted to opioid drugs. Morphine had the highest rate of prescription (86.2%), followed by pethidine (8.5%), methadone (3.3%) and fentanyl (1.68). While initial NRS did not show significant difference between addicted patients and non-addicted ones, NRS decline and its score after drug injection were significantly lower in addicted patients. All patients had slight but statistically significant lower respiratory rate, heart rate, blood pressure and O2 saturation. There was no significant difference between different kind of opioid prescription and its outcomes or side effects. Conclusion: Pain management should be always in physicians’ mind during emergency admissions. It should not be assumed that an addicted patient complaining of pain is malingering to receive drug. Titration of drug and close monitoring must be in the curriculum to prevent any hazardous side effects.

Keywords: Pain, Emergency Department, numerical rating score, opioid

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1 The Relationship between First-Day Body Temperature and Mortality in Traumatic Patients

Authors: Soudabeh Shafiee Ardestani, Neda Valizadeh, Mani Mofidi, Sama Haghighi, Ali Hashemaghaee

Abstract:

Background: There are many systems and parameters to evaluate trauma patients in the emergency department. Most of these evaluations are to distinguish patients with worse conditions so that the care systems have a better prediction of condition for a better care-giving. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between axillary body temperature and mortality in patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) with multiple traumas and with other clinical and para-clinical factors. Methods: All patients between 16 and 75 years old with multiple traumas who were admitted into Emergency Department then hospitalized in the ICU were included in our study. An axillary temperature in the first and the second day of admission, Glasgow cola scale (GCS), systolic blood pressure, Serum glucose levels, and white blood cell counts of all patients at the admission day were recorded and their relationship with mortality were analyzed by SPSS software with suitable statistical tests. Results: Axillary body temperatures in the first and second day were statistically lower in expired traumatic patients (p=0.001 and p<0,001 respectively). Patients with lower GCS had a significantly lower first-day temperature and a significantly higher mortality. (p=0.006 and p=0.006 respectively). Furthermore, the first-day axillary temperature was significantly lower in patients with a lower first-day systolic blood pressure (p=0.014). Conclusion: Our results showed that lower axillary body temperature in the first day is associated with higher mortality, lower GCS, and lower systolic blood pressure. Thus, this could be used as a predictor of mortality in evaluation of traumatic patients in emergency settings.

Keywords: Trauma, Emergency, Mortality, fever

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