Commenced in January 2007
Frequency: Monthly
Edition: International
Paper Count: 3

lysozyme Related Publications

3 Quartz Crystal Microbalance Based Hydrophobic Nanosensor for Lysozyme Detection

Authors: Y. Saylan, A. Denizli, F. Yilmaz, A. Derazshamshir, S. Atay

Abstract:

A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) nanosensor was developed to detect lysozyme enzyme by functionalizing its gold surface with the attachment of poly(methacroyl-L-phenylalanine) (PMAPA) nanoparticles. PMAPA was chosen as a hydrophobic matrix. The hydrophobic nanoparticles were synthesized by micro-emulsion polymerization method. Hydrophobic QCM nanosensor was tested for real time detection of lysozyme enzyme from aqueous solution. The kinetic and affinity studies were determined by using lysozyme solutions with different concentrations. The responses related with mass (Δm) and frequency (Δf) shifts were used to evaluate adsorption properties. 

 

Keywords: nanosensor, QCM, HIC, lysozyme

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2 The Influence of Heat Treatment on Antimicrobial Proteins in Milk

Authors: Inga Ciprovica, Jelena Zagorska

Abstract:

the obligatory step during immunoglobulin and lysozyme concentration process is thermal treatment. The combination of temperature and time used in processing can affect the structure of the proteins and involve unfolding and aggregation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the heat stability of total Igs, the particular immunoglobulin classes and lysozyme in milk. Milk samples were obtained from conventional dairy herd in Latvia. Raw milk samples were pasteurized in different regimes: 63 °C 30 min, 72 °C 15-20 s, 78 °C 15-20 s, 85 °C 15-20 s, 95 °C 15-20 s. The concentrations of Igs (IgA, IgG, IgM) and lysozyme were determined by turbodimetric method. During research was established, that activity of antimicrobial proteins decreases differently. Less concentration reduce was established in a case of lysozyme.

Keywords: Milk, immunoglobulins, Pasteurization, lysozyme

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1 QCM-D Study on Relationship of PEG Coated Stainless Steel Surfaces to Protein Resistance

Authors: Norzita Ngadi, John Abrahamson, Conan Fee, Ken Morison

Abstract:

Nonspecific protein adsorption generally occurs on any solid surfaces and usually has adverse consequences. Adsorption of proteins onto a solid surface is believed to be the initial and controlling step in biofouling. Surfaces modified with end-tethered poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) have been shown to be protein-resistant to some degree. In this study, the adsorption of β-casein and lysozyme was performed on 6 different types of surfaces where PEG was tethered onto stainless steel by polyethylene imine (PEI) through either OH or NHS end groups. Protein adsorption was also performed on the bare stainless steel surface as a control. The adsorption was conducted at 23 °C and pH 7.2. In situ QCM-D was used to determine PEG adsorption kinetics, plateau PEG chain densities, protein adsorption kinetics and plateau protein adsorbed quantities. PEG grafting density was the highest for a NHS coupled chain, around 0.5 chains / nm2. Interestingly, lysozyme which has smaller size than β-casein, appeared to adsorb much less mass than that of β- casein. Overall, the surface with high PEG grafting density exhibited a good protein rejection.

Keywords: stainless steel, lysozyme, PEG, QCM-D, β-casein

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